West African Christianity the religious impact by Lamin O. Sanneh

Cover of: West African Christianity | Lamin O. Sanneh

Published by Orbis Books in Maryknoll, N.Y .

Written in English

Read online

Subjects:

  • Christianity -- Africa, West -- History.,
  • Africa, West -- Church history.

Edition Notes

Book details

StatementLamin Sanneh.
The Physical Object
Paginationxviii, 286 p. :
Number of Pages286
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL16115676M
ISBN 100883447037

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The book focus on the encounter of West Africa with the diverse religious traditions that has shaped the sub-regional history. It traced the advent of Christianity into West Africa, beginning with the Portuguese and their desire to find the Kingdom of John by: 9.

West African Christianity: The Religious Impact. In this fascinating reevaluation of Christian history, West African Christianity concentrates on the role of Africans as the principal agents of, and the significance of African materials in, the spread of Christianity /5.

The book focus on the encounter of West Africa with the diverse religious traditions that has shaped the sub-regional history.

It traced the advent of Christianity into West Africa, beginning with the Portuguese and their desire to find the Kingdom of John by: He became a scholar of Christianity and Islam. He was the author or editor of more than 20 books including Translating the Message: The Missionary Impact on Culture, Abolitionists Abroad: American Blacks and the Making of Modern West Africa, Summoned from the Margin: Homecoming of an African, and Beyond Jihad: The Pacifist Tradition in West African Islam.

Check out the new look and enjoy easier access to your favorite features. ISBN: OCLC Number: Description: xviii, pages: 1 map ; 22 cm: Contents: African Christian antecedents in antiquity --The early pioneers: the church comes to West Africa, --Missionary activity in Benin, Warri and São Tomé, --The establishment of Christian colonies in West Africa: Sierra Leone and Liberia.

Christianity's centre of gravity has shifted in the modern world from the Northern continents to the South, with Africa playing a significant role in the resurgence of the faith. In this, the first book to examine this global transformation from an African perspective, Kwame Bediako surveys the new role of African Christianity.

Christianity in Africa: The Renewal of Non-Western Format: Paperback. The first Europeans arrived on the coast of W.

Africa at the end of the 15th cent., but for the most part they were involved in the slave trade rather than in evangelization. In the 19th cent. there was sustained missionary activity by Churches of every denomination. Anglicans, Methodists, and Baptists were active in Sierra Leone and, with Presbyterians, in Nigeria, while Methodists also.

West African Christianity: The Religious Impact. London: Hurst, E-mail Citation» This text by a notable scholar of both Christianity and Islam concentrates on the religious dimensions of West African Christianity and the roles of both missionaries and. book, How Africa Shaped the Christian Mind, is a clarion call for a robust historical and theological reassessment of early African Christianity.

His central argument is that intellectual developments within early African Christi anity shaped world Christianity in decisive Size: 20KB. Along with publishing a first book by an emerging new African poet each year, the Africa Book Fund has also committed to publishing a collected edition of “a major living African poet” each year, and this year it is Gabriel Okara, the only person who could ever be called both “the elder statesman of Nigerian literature and the first Modernist poet of Anglophone Africa.”Author: Aaron Bady.

The African Christianity studied in this book thus appears to be a variation of western Christianity; it speaks about “Africa” without actually speaking about Africa.

This difficulty notwithstanding, scholars of both ancient and contemporary African Christianity will benefit from engaging with this book.

Biblical Christianity in African Perspective, Wilbur O’Donovan, This is a basic systematic theology for African students. It covers many of the usual topics found in a theology textbook, plus some topics that are of particular applicability to Africa. The normal theological doctrines are present: the Bible, the nature of God, the person and work.

Stock No: WW This study of the religious impact of Christianity in West Africa concentrates on the role of Africans as the principle agents in the spread of the religion and on the significance of Africn meterials.

Previous studies have mainly focused on the organization of the missionary effort in Europe and America, with African Christianity seen as a direct Format: Paperback. Book Details In this fascinating re-evaluation of Christian history West African Christianity concentrates on the role of Africans as the principal agents of, and the significance of African materials in, the spread of Christianity from its earliest centuries.

Additionally, she notes that half of Africa's Christian population is Catholic. Philip Jenkins highlights the growth of Christianity in Africa, projected to continue well into the 21st century.

In particular, he notes the growth of African churches detached from Western mission churches. The Encyclopedia of Christian Civilization is a uniquely comprehensive reference work on the history and impact of Christianity.

Bringing together over international scholars and 1, entries across 2, pages, this four-volume work spans issues ranging from theology, politics, and law, through to literature, art, and architecture.

ISBN: OCLC Number: Description: xviii, pages: maps ; 22 cm: Contents: African Christian antecedents in antiquity --The early pioneers: the church comes to West Africa, --Missionary activity in Benin, Warri and São Tomé, --The establishment of Christian colonies in West Africa: Sierra Leone and.

Christianity is embraced by the majority of the population in most Southern African, Southeast African, and Central African states and others in some parts of Horn of Africa and West Africa. The Coptic Christians make up a significant minority in Egypt. Christianity was the first world religion on the continent and spread across north Africa from the 1st century C.E.

Islam supplanted Christianity in the region in the 7th century. As a result of the influence of Christian missionaries and western colonialism, Christianity became firmly entrenched in most of Africa by the s.

West African Christianity: The Religious Impact: Sanneh, Lamin: Books - 5/5(2). African religion, we are not stressing its primitive nature as some opine nor are we stressing that it is a fossil religion – a religion that is incapable of adapting to changes.

African religion is traditional for the following reasons: (i) It is a religion that evolved from the personal experiences of the peoples of Africa. The African-American Century: How Black Americans Have Shaped Our Country.

Buy On ; Buy On Barnes & Noble. Sanneh converted to Christianity from Islam and was a practicing Roman Catholic. Another major area of Sanneh's academic work was in the study of World Christianity.

He wrote extensively about the translation of the Christian message, challenging a good deal of the accepted history of mission in the modern utions: University of Ghana, University of. African Christianity Rising‘s first review. By Philip Jenkins–Read here. Read reviews in Christian Century, Missiology, and in the International Bulletin of Missionary Research by Alan Anderson About.

Christianity’s explosive growth in Africa is part of a startling reversal in world history. Christianity is no longer the religion of the West. A brief West African history, its past civilization and tourist attractions. Transatlantic Slave Trade and Amistad revolt; European colonialism, Chiefdoms, traditional beliefs in sorcery and witchcrafts celebration after midnight, cultural heritage, how women secret societies operate and.

As our ancestors understood, West African cosmology comports well with Christianity because the gospel clarifies rather than contradicts pre-existing African theological and social structures. people and, Christianity and Islam in the area.

The chapters five, six and seven, which deal with the data analysis of the research and the conclusion (chapter eight) form the section B. 1 “Memory and Mission” in Dictionary of African Christian Biography(DACB), New. Want to learn from an African Christian leader. There’s Augustine, Cyprian, and many other African theologians from the church’s first centuries.

including books, from the West as superior. Explore our list of Free eBooks, Christian Fiction - African American, Christian Fiction & Literature, NOOK Books at Barnes & Noble®.

Shop now & receive FREE shipping with your Barnes & Noble Membership. CHRISTIAN MISSIONS AND COLONIAL RULE IN AFRICA: OBJECTIVE AND CONTEMPORARY ANALYSIS Dr. Etim E. Okon Senior Lecturer, Department of Religious and Cultural Studies, University of Calabar Abstract The purpose of this paper is to determine the correlation between the nineteenth century missionary enterprise and colonial occupation of.

West and Central Africa. The West African area is important because this is where the majority of slaves departed for the New World. Hence large elements of West African, particularly Yoruba, religion (blended with Catholicism) can be found in religions such as Vodun (also known as Voodoo) (Haiti), Candomblè (Brazil) and Santeria (Carribean).

Traditional African spirituality is an umbrella term for an assortment of beliefs that may or may not fit into a particular dogma. It can be Ifá, Vodou, Santería, Candomblé or other variations of Yoruba religious traditions, coming from the West African region Author: Luna Malbroux.

Christian community in shaping Africa's future, towards greater liberation and humanisation. Church leaders and theological educators as often as not have assumed that African Theology denotes little more than providing traditional Christian theology with an African face.furnishing Christian truth with contextually­.

The spread of Christianity throughout Egypt and Northern Africa, during the first five centuries was rapid and intense, despite the prevalence of false teachings, persecutions and martyrdom. Some religious scholars believe that Christianity was introduced to Africans by way of the Egyptian city of Alexandria.

Reportedly, the city boasted a very Author: Karenp. In the twentieth century, Christianity in Africa exploded from an estimated population of eight or nine million in (8 to 9%) to some million in (45%), marking a shift in the “center of gravity of Christianity” from the West to.

This is a short history of Africa excluding Egypt, Ethiopia and (Dutch and British) South Africa, which are the subjects of separate histories. Some of the history of these countries, however, is naturally mentioned in this history of the rest of Africa - but is kept to the minimum needed to make the rest comprehensible.

The Three Cs (Christianity, Commerce And Civilization Words | 5 Pages. prioritization of the three Cs (Christianity, Commerce and Civilization) reveal about the people who engaged in the early repatriation movement of African descendants from the Americas that they were looking for the “Black Nationality” by establishing an American colony in Africa.

As Lamin Sanneh points out, the roots of African Christianity goes beyond the Euro-American missionary activities in Africa. He notes, “The roots of that contact can be traced back to the very beginning of Christianity itself, when Africans played a prominent role in the life and expansion of the early Church” (Sanneh, ).

West African Religion: Illustrated from the Beliefs and Practices of the Yoruba, Ewe, Akan, and Kindred Peoples. London: Epworth Press, Parrinder was an anthropologist and scholar of comparative religion who wrote in conversation with historians, specifically Melville Herskovits.

The traditional African religions (or traditional beliefs and practices of African people) are a set of highly diverse beliefs that includes various ethnic religions. Generally, these traditions are oral rather than scriptural, include belief in an amount of higher and lower gods, sometimes including a supreme creator, belief in spirits, veneration of the dead, use of magic and traditional.Mbiti defines African Theology as a "theological reflection and expression by African Christians".

1 During the independence movement from European colonialism of sub-Saharan Africa in the s and s, African Theology transformed the biblical faith of Christ and Christian truth from a Euro-centric expression. The bible became the. In the late 18th century, Methodist Episcopal and later African Methodist Episcopal (A.M.E.) preachers carried the Christian message to .

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